American Son

White text on blue/red background reads AMERICAN SON. A NEW BROADWAY PLAY.

Show Details

Performance Schedule

TUESDAY thru THURSDAY @ 7 PM
FRIDAY & SATURDAY @ 8 PM
WEDNESDAY & SATURDAY @ 2 PM
SUNDAY @ 3 PM

Run Dates

October 06, 2018 - January 27, 2019

Upcoming Scheduled Events

January 19, 2019

Running Time

Read Reviews Visit Show Website

Show Description

American Son is a gripping tale of two parents (Kerry Washington & Steven Pasquale) caught in our national divide, with their worst fears hanging in the balance.

Do you know where your children are?

A Florida police station in the middle of the night; a mother searching for her missing teenage son. American Son is a gripping tale of two parents caught in our national divide, with their worst fears hanging in the balance.

2016 Laurents/Hatcher Award for Best New Play by an Emerging Playwright.

Audience Advisory

Adult language No performance 11/22

Tickets


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Standard Tickets


October 06, 2018 - January 27, 2019

Wheelchair seating, assistive listening devices, handheld captions, and prerecorded audio description are always available.

For Show Times, see Performance Schedule above.


Wheelchair

Use the standard ticket button to purchase tickets.

Hearing: Assistive Listening Devices

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Closed Captioning

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Audio Description: Pre-recorded

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Open Captioning Tickets


January 19, 2019

Saturday @ 7:00 PM


Theatre Details

Address

Booth Theatre
222 W 45th St
New York, NY 10036

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Public Transportation

By Bus: Take the M7, M20, or M104 bus.

By Subway: 1, 2, 3, 7, S, A, C, E, N, R, Q, W to 42nd St/Times Square

Additional Accessibility Details

Wheelchairs: Seating is accessible to all parts of the Orchestra without steps. Five ADA compliant viewing locations with companion seating. Transfer optional. ADA seats priced at regular orchestra and also at lowest price in the theatre.

Seating: Orchestra on ground level. Mezzanine and lower lounge reached only by stairs. seats 781.

Elevator\Escalator: There are no elevators or escalators at this theatre.

Parking: Lot: North side of streetbetween Broadway & 8th Ave. Vans enter on 46th St.Garage: East of Shubert Alley on south side of 45th St. between Broadway & 8th Ave. No vans.

Curb Ramps: (2.5" lip) SW corner of 45th St. & Broadway; NW corner of 45th St. & Broadway.

Entrance: Double doors in series:1st set (each 27") has one pair of automatic doors from Shubert Alley to Ticket Lobby with push-button control; 2nd set (each 29", attended by ushers) to inner lobby; 3rd set (one at 31.5", two at 28.5", attended by ushers) into Orchestra.

Box Office: Ticket Lobby. Counter 43". Accessible pass-through with writing shelf at 32". Assistance available.

Restroom: Unisex: House left at orchestra rear crossover aisle. ADA compliant. Door 32". Stall 62"x139". Commode 18". Grab bars.

Water Fountain: Inner lobby. Spout 36".

Telephone: Ticket lobby. Coin slot 54". Cord length 30". Volume control. With TTY and electric outlet.

Assisted Listening System: Reservations are not necessary. Drivers license or ID with printed address required as a deposit.

Folding Armrests: Eight row-end seats with folding armrests, ask for mobility seats when booking.

Reviews (3)

But it is also true that taking the racing pulse of these jittery times with such head-on forthrightness is what gives the play its powerful, ultimately shattering charge. “American Son,” acted with sharp focus by its cast of four under Kenny Leon’s solid direction, may not reveal to us anything new about what it means to live while black in America (unless you’ve been, I don’t know, digging for clams for the past several years), but it explores the experience with a clarity, probity and intensity that cannot be denied. The play is not always subtle, but in that sense it also mirrors the reality of living in a dramatically polarized America.

CONTINUE READING THE BROADWAY NEWS REVIEW

Enhancing the production is an outstanding company of A-listers: Jeremy Jordan as a young white cop limited by his narrow world view; Eugene Lee providing the pragmatic voice of a black man who's learned how to straddle both sides to survive; Steven Pasquale as a member of the ruling class who's never had to compromise; and Kerry Washington — at times combative and emotionally overwrought — reflects the soul-crippling history of the black experience in America.

CONTINUE READING THE NY1 REVIEW

what Washington is doing is out of an older, more frightening ritual than the conventional Broadway play. She takes the rage, sorrow and guilt of our whole city-state and channels them into a single cry."

CONTINUE READING THE TIME OUT NEW YORK REVIEW