Linda Vista

A girl wearing large rings with purple nail polish, pink hair and tattoos covers the eyes of a gentleman with a slight beard. There are blue skies and palm trees.

Show Details

Performance Schedule

TUESDAY & THURSDAY @ 7 PM
WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY @ 8 PM
WEDNESDAY & SATURDAY @ 2 PM
SUNDAY @ 3 PM

Run Dates

September 19, 2019 - November 10, 2019

Upcoming Scheduled Events

November 03, 2019

Running Time

2:40 hrs

Read Reviews Visit Show Website

Show Description

Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award® winner Tracy Letts (August: Osage County) returns to Second Stage (Mary Page Marlowe, Man from Nebraska) with a brutally comedic look at Wheeler, a 50-year-old divorcee in the throes of a mid-life spiral.

Just out of his ex-wife’s garage and into a place of his own, Wheeler starts on a path toward self-discovery — navigating blind dates, old friends, and new love. Full of opinions, yet short on self-examination, Wheeler must reconcile the man he has become with the man he wants to be.

“Might just be Mr. Letts’ best play yet!” The Wall Street Journal

Audience Advisory

Performance contains adult situations and full frontal nudity.

Tickets


40 Shows fit your search criteria

Standard Tickets


September 19, 2019 - November 10, 2019

Wheelchair seating and assistive listening devices are always available.

For Show Times, see Performance Schedule above.


Wheelchair

Use the standard ticket button to purchase tickets.

Hearing: Assistive Listening Devices

Use the standard ticket button to purchase tickets.

Open Captioning Tickets


November 03, 2019

Sunday @ 3:00 PM


Theatre Details

Address

Helen Hayes Theater
240 W 44th St
New York, NY 10036

View Larger Map

Public Transportation

By Bus: M42

By Subway: 1,2,3,7,S,A,C,E,N,R,Q,W to 42nd St./Times square

Additional Accessibility Details

Wheelchairs: Accessible seating in both Orchestra & Mezzanine

Seating: Orchestra on ground level. Seats 589.

Elevator\Escalator: Full-service/accessible elevator

Parking: Valet parking garages: 1st garage: South side of 44th St. between 6th & 7th Aves. Vertical clearance: 105". 2nd garage: East of Shubert Alley, on north side of 44th St. between Broadway & 8th Ave. No vans.

Curb Ramps: (2.5" lip) NW corner of 44th & Broadway; (2.5" lip) SE corner of 44th St. & Broadway; SW corner of 44th St. & Broadway.

Entrance: ADA-accessible building entrance at Stage Door. Handicap ramps in the lower lobby,

Box Office: Outer lobby, ground level. ADA access via the Stage Door.

Restroom: Accessible/unisex bathrooms/stalls in the lower lobby and at the mezzanine level

Water Fountain: Lower Level directly across from the elevator

Telephone: None on premises

Assisted Listening System: LOOP system in the auditorium, headsets available. Driver’s license or ID with printed address required as a deposit. Not available in the first 3 rows of the Orchestra.

Reviews (3)

A sad romantic comedy sounds like a contradiction in terms, but it’s an apt-enough description of “Linda Vista,” a slight but funny and quietly affecting play from Tracy Letts

CONTINUE READING THE BROADWAY NEWS REVIEW

Tracy Letts, the profusely gifted playwright who also happens to be a brilliant actor, or vice versa, is working in an elevated sitcom mode as well as a revealing personal vein in Linda Vista. The self-inflicted woes of a middle-aged white man, victim of his own inebriating cocktail of testosterone and narcissism, might seem a tone-deaf subject for character study in our current moment of masculinity vivisected and reconstructed. But don't let the slick barrage of one-liners deceive you into thinking there's no room here for bruising self-examination and perhaps even tentative growth.

CONTINUE READING THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER REVIEW

For all its easygoing pace and humor, Linda Vista goes to some truly dark places. The challenge here is to show how Wheeler’s corrosive charm grows on people, how he wears them down with his languid, often entertaining negativity, while also revealing the toxicity and sense of entitlement that runs beneath his persona. In the end, he’s just another jerk who expects the world to come to him, and leaves devastation in his wake. But that also makes him relatable; we’ve all known our share of Wheelers, and most of us have probably been some variation of him at various points in our lives.

CONTINUE READING THE VULTURE REVIEW